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Tanzania

Tanzania: Wildlife Ecology and Conservation

Description

Develop insight into the delicate balance between socioeconomic goals and ecological concerns in the vast wilderness expanses of Tanzania. Home to Serengeti National Park—the site of the largest wildlife migration on earth—Tanzania features tropical, temperate, and alpine forests. Ngorongoro Crater, a 12-mile-wide extinct volcano, isone of the wonders of the natural world. Within these disparate ecosystems, issues of population growth, land use, and tourism development are in tense juxtaposition with wildlife conservation efforts.

From the program base in the heart of Tanzania’s most renowned wilderness parks, students explore the country's diverse human and natural environments through seminars and field visits to nature reserves and conservation areas. Swahili language study and a rural stay with a Maasai community complement classroom work and field research.

Note: Depending on your college, this program may not be pre-approved, and may require special petition. Do not let this discourage you. For more information, contact your school’s study abroad office:

FMI

Tanzania: Zanzibar – Coastal Ecology

Description

Examine issues of natural resource management and poverty in this densely populated archipelago of more than 50 islands. Once the thriving hub of the East African caravan trade, Zanzibar today depends on natural resources for its very survival. Yet basic economic activities threaten fragile local ecosystems like coastal forests and coral reefs, and vulnerable fauna like flying foxes and whale sharks. Participants explore conservation practice through dialogue with ecologists, policymakers, and communities struggling to balance livelihoods with sustainability in a resource-poor setting.

Based in Zanzibar’s Stone Town at the Institute of Marine Science, the program includes excursions throughout the Zanzibar and Mafia archipelagos and along the mainland coast. Lectures and visits to protected areas highlight the complex dynamics of local ecosystems. Additional excursions challenge students to reframe notions of sustainability and "overpopulation" in light of the factors driving environmental degradation.

Note: Depending on your college, this program may not be pre-approved, and may require special petition. Do not let this discourage you. For more information, contact your school’s study abroad office:

FMI