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New Book by Pomona College Professor Combines Art History, Literary Criticism

Manet, Flaubert, and the Emergence of Modernism: Blurring Genre Boundaries (2003, Cambridge University Press) is a compelling new book that combines art history and literary criticism in a joint study of the canonical "fathers" of modernism: artist Edouard Manet and writer Gustave Flaubert.

In Manet, Flaubert and the Emergence of Modernism, author and Pomona College Professor Arden Reed contests the Greenbergian view that equates modernism with purity of formal means. Modernism, he argues, is a matter of genre bending and hybridization, as well as movements between text and image. Focusing on key works by Manet and Flaubert, Reed articulates a novel understanding of the cultural imagination of early modernism. He shows how Manet and Flaubert actively mix and contaminate their work: Flaubert with images, Manet with narration. Moreover, Reed extends the argument another hundred years, to the late 1960s, claiming we cannot understand 20th-century modernism so long as we remain locked within single disciplines.

Arden Reed is a Professor of English at Pomona College. A recipient of fellowships from the Camargo Foundation, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Humanities, he is the author of Romantic Weather: The Climates of Coleridge and Baudelaire, which won the First Book Prize from Brown University Press, and it the editor of Romanticism and Language.

Pomona College, founding member of the prestigious Claremont Colleges, is one of the nation’s premier liberal arts institutions. Pomona College is located in the eastern end of Los Angeles County in the city of Claremont.

Manet, Flaubert, and the Emergence of Modernism: Blurring Genre Boundaries
Cambridge University Press | November 2003 | 372 pages 85 half-tones 9 color plates.