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"Globalization and the Nation-State" Subject of Lecture at Pomona College

As global capitalism spreads, it poses questions regarding its impact on nation-states and American military power. Are these intersections a threat? Or is it possible for these elements to work together? Ronald Grigor Suny will discuss these issues in his lecture "Globalization and the Nation-State: The Future of Failures," which will be held at Pomona College on Thursday, February 12 at 8 p.m. He will closely examine Russia, China and Japan's roles in the current economic crisis, and in relationship to U.S. power. 

Suny is the author of A State of Nations: Empire and Nation-making in the Age of Lenin and Stalin (2001). According to the Journal of Modern History, his book, "gives a very useful overview of the actual situation of …'empire and nation-making' from the late tsarist empire to the end of the Stalin era…[showing] convincingly its contradictions and improvisations, the simultaneity and interdependence of nation creating and nation destroying. " 

Suny is currently working on a two-volume biography of Stalin and a co-edited volume on the Armenian genocide, examining empire, nations and ethnic politics. He is a professor of social and political history at the University of Michigan and professor emeritus of political science and history at the University of Chicago. 

This lecture is part of the Pacific Basin Institute's R. Stanton Avery Lecture Series and will be held in Pomona College's Rose Hills Theatre (Smith Campus Center, 170 East 6th Street, Claremont). For further information, call (909) 607-8035. 

The Pacific Basin Institute is dedicated to expanding and enhancing comity and shared knowledge among the nations and cultures that face the Pacific. An acclaimed study, media production and research center for distinguished scholarship, PBI also offers books, film series and lecture programs to a general as well as academic audience. Since the turn of the past century Pomona College has been a leader in Asian Studies among American universities.