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Video: Visiting History Professor Aviva Chomsky Lectures on the Theory and Practice of Illegality

Visiting Professor of History Aviva Chomsky gave the talk "Undocumented: The Theory and Practice of Illegality" on February 28, 2013 at Pomona College.

The presentation analyzed how the role of illegality or "undocumented" plays in our society and economy. It discusses how the status was created, and how and why people, especially Mexicans and Central Americans, have been assigned this status. The talk will also review the importance of being "undocumented" in the contemporary economy, and look at "solutions" that have been proposed to the problem in past and present. Finally, it will also critically examine and redefine what is actually the "problem" if we wish to discuss serious solutions.

Aviva Chomsky is author of They Take Our Jobs! And 20 Other Myths About Immigration; Linked Labor Histories: New England, Colombia, and the Making of a Global Working Class; and A History of the Cuban Revolution. She has been active in Latin American solidarity and the immigrant rights' movement for over 25 years. Chomsky is currently Ena H. Thompson Visiting Professor in the Department of History at Pomona College and is a history professor and coordinator of Latin American Studies at Salem State University.

Chomsky will be giving a talk on "Whose Planet? Whose Economic Development? Coal and Human Rights in Colombia" on Thursday, April 4, at 12 p.m. at Oldenborg Dining Hall. This presentation analyzes the human impact of coal mining in Colombia in global context. Indigenous and Afro-Colombian communities are being displaced and destroyed as foreign companies have developed some of the world's largest open-pit mines to extract coal for export to Europe and the United States. It will also discuss how the U.S. economy and its ideas about economic development are linked to social and environmental destruction in Colombia.

Both talks are sponsored by the Oldenborg Luncheon Colloquium, the Department of History and the Department of Latin American Studies.