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Healthcare.gov Fixer Mikey Dickerson '01 Gets a New Mission from the White House

Mikey Dickerson '01

The White House announced today that Mikey Dickerson '01, who played a key role in fixing the Healthcare.gov website, will head the new U.S. Digital Service.

In this role, Dickerson will direct "a small team made up of our country's brightest digital talent that will work with agencies to remove barriers to exceptional service delivery and help remake the digital experience that people and businesses have with their government,” according to the White House blog.

A former Google site-reliability engineer who also helped with computer work on the Obama campaign, Dickerson made the cover of Time magazine in March for his leadership in getting Healthcare.gov working.

“Mikey is an incredible talent who was seemingly built in a lab to help fix .gov,” says Todd Park, the U.S. chief technology officer, in a soon-to-be-published article about Dickerson in Pomona College Magazine. “It’s not just the fact that he’s got a sky-high IQ, honed over years as a star site reliability engineering leader. He’s also got tremendous EQ, enabling him to step into a tough situation, mesh well with others, and help rally them to the job at hand.”

In an article published today, Dickerson told The Washington Post blog that fixing Healthcare.gov was “a life-changing experience…[and] when the White House said they were serious about applying the same model to the rest of the federal government…‘there was really not any way that I could say no to that.’”

Pomona College Professor Erica Flapan remembers math-major Dickerson as “smart, hard working, serious, but with a dry sense of humor.” Before joining Google, he was a computer systems manager for Pomona College and, according to the PCM article, the Connecticut native "was already coding for various companies while still in school."

The PCM article, to be published later this month, also notes that Dickerson has “become an outspoken advocate for reform in the ways government builds technology, concentrating especially on trying to convince young technologists to go work for government.”

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