Fall 2019 Community Partnership Courses

Economics of Entrepreneurship CP (ECON131 PO-01)

Professor Manisha Goel

Entrepreneurs are critical to the growth of an economy. This course explores the determinants and consequences of entrepreneurship, including differences in challenges faced by gender and race, impact on economic growth, sources of finance and implications for job creation. We also contrast the implications of and challenges to entrepreneurship across countries. This is a community partnership course and will involve interviewing new and small businesses in the local area. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: ECON051 PO and ECON052 PO.

More on Economics of Entrepreneurship CP

Community Engagement Lacrosse CP (PE 080 PO-01)

Professor Sarah K. Queener

This course is offered in cooperation with the Draper Center. Students learn how to play lacrosse and how to teach the sport to elementary age students over first 3 weeks of the semester, then are assigned to direct an after school lacrosse program at a local elementary school for the remaining 8-9 weeks. Students gain valuable lessons in group management, social engagement, and multicultural understanding. Prior knowledge of lacrosse is not necessary, but a love of working with kids is mandatory. May be repeated for credit.

More on Community Engagement Lacrosse CP

Religion, Ethics & Social Practice CP (RLST155 PO-01)

Professor Zayn Kassam

Through direct experience, related readings, structured reflection and intergenerational discussion this course seeks to develop informed responses to the following questions: What are the religious, ethical and/or simply humane elements that motivate and sustain our social practice? How does our present commitment to justice become a lifelong vocation of participation and leadership in effective social change? How does our own personal development foster or inhibit our capacity to deal effectively with injustice? To what extent do factors such as class, gender and ethnicity determine our assumptions about the human condition and our own role in society? We will address these questions in an intergenerational partnership of faculty and students from The Claremont Colleges, residents of Pilgrim Place (a retirement community where many have devoted a lifetime to service and/or social change agency) and other Elders similarly committed to social justice. This fertile mix of differing age perspectives, diverse experiences and our work together will culminate in undergraduate proposals for a three to nine month project of social change in the U.S. or abroad.

More on Religion, Ethics & Social Practice CP

Prison Punishment Redemption CP (RLST181 PO-01)

Professor Erin Runions

This course will explore ideologies of punishment and redemption in relation to the prison industrial complex. We will critique and redefine themes of redemption, correction, debt, virtue, shame, guilt, purity, atonement, damnation, hell and conversion as they influence, infuse and complicate popular understanding of prison, policy development and lived experience of prison. We will be analyzing religious teaching, literature, media, pop culture, policy, political discourse and art. The approach taken will be interdisciplinary with intersectional analysis that includes race, gender, sexuality, ability, class, age, mobility, literacy, education, nationality. Six times in the semester students will take part in a writing workshop in the prison California Institute for Women. Letter grade only. Previously offered as GWS 181 PO.

More on Prison Punishment Redemption CP

Theatre for Young Audiences CP (THEA061 PO-01)

Professor Rose Portillo

Theatre for Young Audiences

A practicum-based examination of the theories and practice of creating dramatic work for young audiences. Working with local school groups, participants develop a script and mount a production for performances on campus and/or in a school setting. Prior theatre experience is desirable but not required.

More on Theatre for Young Audiences CP 

Spring 2020 Community Partnership Courses 

Environmental Senior Seminar CP (EA190 PO)

Professor Char Miller; Professor Guillermo Douglass-Jaimes

A required capstone, team-based seminar in which senior EA majors focus their various curricular backgrounds on environmental issues and problems as defined by real-world clients. Past clients have included Pomona College’s Sustainability Integration Office, Scripps College, the City of Claremont, Rancho Santa Ana Botanical Gardens, Sustainable Claremont, UnCommon Good and USGS. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: EA 010 PO, EA 020 PO, EA 030 PO and EA 191 PO. 

More on Environment senior seminar cp

Mathematical Modeling CP (MATH183 PO)

Professor Ami Radunskaya; Professor Adolfo Rumbos; Professor Blerta Shtylla

Introduction to the construction and interpretation of deterministic and stochastic models in the biological, social and physical sciences, including simulation studies. Students are required to develop a model in an area of their interest. Offered with an optional Community Partnership activity. Prerequisite: MATH 102 PO.

More on Mathematical Modeling cp

Community Engagement Through Tennis CP (PE077E PO)

Professor Steven Bickham

This course is offered in cooperation with the Draper Center. Students learn how to play tennis and how to teach the sport to elementary age students over first 3 weeks of the semester, then are assigned to direct an after-school tennis program at a local elementary school for the remaining 8-9 weeks. Students gain valuable lessons in group management, social engagement and multicultural understanding. Prior knowledge of tennis is not necessary, but a love of working with kids is mandatory. P/NC only. May be repeated for credit.

More on Community engagement through tennis cp

Gender, Crime and Punishment CP (PHIL039 PO)

Professor Susan Castagnetto

Addresses issues of crime and punishment focusing on gender, race and class. Topics include gender and crime; gendered aspects of punishment; women’s rights violations in prison; impact of the war on drugs, harsh sentencing and prison growth on women and their families; issues post-release; alternatives to incarceration. Community partnership with local state women’s prison.

More on Gender, crime and punishment cp

Electronics with Laboratory CP (PHYS128 PO)

Professor Richard Mawhorter

Electronics with Laboratory. Transistors and integrated circuits in a variety of applications, including operational amplifiers, basic digital circuits, analog/digital conversion and an introduction to microprocessors. Course contains a community partnership component. Project required. Prerequisites: PHYS 041 PO and PHYS 042 PO , or PHYS 070 PO.

More on Electronics with laboratory cp

Gender, Crime and Punishment CP (PHIL039 PO)

Professor Susan Castagnetto

Addresses issues of crime and punishment focusing on gender, race and class. Topics include gender and crime; gendered aspects of punishment; women’s rights violations in prison; impact of the war on drugs, harsh sentencing and prison growth on women and their families; issues post-release; alternatives to incarceration. Community partnership with local state women’s prison.

More on Gender, crime and punishment cp

Fieldwork in Clinical Psychology CP (PSYC133 PO)

Staff

Integration of theory with personal experience in a clinical or applied behavior setting. Practical training in listening skills and the observation and understanding of human behavior. Enrollment by permission only. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: PSYC 131 PO.

More on Fieldwork in clinical psychology cp

Theatre for Young Audiences CP (THEA060 PO)

Professor Rose Portillo

Theatre for Young Audiences

A practicum-based examination of the theories and practice of creating dramatic work for young audiences. Working with local school groups, participants develop a script and mount a production for performances on campus and/or in a school setting. Prior theatre experience is desirable but not required. THEA060  PO (.5 course credits) and THEA061  PO (1 course credit) are repeatable up to a limit of 2 course credits total from either or both courses.

More on Theatre for young audiences cp

Theatre for Young Audiences CP (THEA061 PO)

Theatre for Young Audiences

Professor Rose Portillo

Same course as THEA 060 PO, but with additional reading of critical text, discussion and written assignments. A practicum-based examination of the theories and practices of creating dramatic work for young audiences. Working with local school groups, participants will develop a script and mount a production for performances on campus and/or in a school setting. Prior theatre experience is desirable but not required. THEA060  PO (.5 course credits) and THEA061  PO (1 course credit) are repeatable up to a limit of 2 course credits total from either or both courses.

More on Theatre for young audiences cp

Introduction to Directing CP (THEA130 PO)

Professor Jessie Mills; Professor Giovanni Ortega

Same course as THEA 060 PO, but with additional reading of critical text, discussion and written assignments. A practicum-based examination of the theories and practices of creating dramatic work for young audiences. Working with local school groups, participants will develop a script and mount a production for performances on campus and/or in a school setting. Prior theatre experience is desirable but not required. THEA060  PO (.5 course credits) and THEA061  PO (1 course credit) are repeatable up to a limit of 2 course credits total from either or both courses.

More on introduction to directing cp