Each summer, about 200 Pomona College students conduct research projects in various disciplines. Below are recent projects from students in the Classics Department.

2015

Ethics in Petrarch's De Viris Illustribus

Max Aguero ’17; Mentor: Christopher Chinn

My research project revolved around Francesco Petrarch’s book De Viris Illustribus, a series of biographies about the great men of the ancient world. The first part of my research focused on translating certain sections of the work from the original Latin into English. In particular, I translated the biographies of Romulus, the legendary founder of Rome; Cincinnatus, a Roman farmer-turned-dictator; Alexander the Great, the leader of the massive Macedonian empire; and Hanibal, the great general of Carthage. I also translated the Prohemium, the introduction to the work. The second part of my research will be spent writing an ethical analysis of the book, investigating Petrarch’s own worldview and how he and many of his contemporaries understood the ancient world. Petrarch himself even remarks that this work was always intended to be an exploration of the vices and virtues of men, so an ethical analysis of the book should prove fruitful. Since no part of this book has ever been translated into English, I hope my translation will be helpful to future students, classicists, and historians. Furthermore, analyzing this particular work from an ethical standpoint has never been attempted, so perhaps in my investigation the subtle nuances of Petrarch’s moral views will be illuminated. I intend to complete the second phase of my project (i.e. the ethical analysis) during my senior year, with the whole project hopefully culminating into my senior thesis in classics.
Funding Provided By: NEH

2014

Sicilian Culture and the Myth of Romanization

William Robinson (2015); Mentor(s): Benjamin Keim

Abstract: The island of Sicily was the first Roman territory on the Italian Peninsula. After defeating Carthage in the First Punic War in the first half of the 3rd Century BC, Sicily became a province administered by Roman authorities. However, though Rome controlled the island, was it also changed to become culturally Roman. Sicily already had a rich cultural tapestry stemming from Carthaginian and Greek inhabitants mixing with native Sicilians. So did the initial political and military domination by Rome also include cultural domination? What was Roman imperialism and how did it culturally affect the societies Rome ruled? In its growing power, it would seem that Rome left Sicily largely untouched after the end of the First Punic War. Archaeological surveys do not indicate a significant shift until after the Second Punic War. Analysis of historiography and secondary literature seem to corroborate the stability of the mixed Sicilian culture in the face of Roman rule. This research project involved a large survey of the history before, during, and immediately after the First Punic War in order to fully understand the cultural changes or lack thereof in Sicily. 
Funding provided by National Endowment for the Humanities

Translation and Commentary on Ovid's Tristia 4.10

Fiona Riley (2015); Mentor(s): Christopher Chinn

Abstract: Roman poet Ovid was banished from Rome in 8 CE by the emperor Augustus and driven to live in the town of Tomis, on the Black Sea. Ovid, famous for his Amores, Ars, Fasti, and Metamorphoses, continued writing in exile and produced Tristia and Epistulae ex Ponto, his “Exile Poetry.” The reason for his banishment is unknown. Ovid is reticent about it in his poetry, attributing his exile to a mysterious carmen et error. Ovid’s Exile Poetry has received relatively little scholarly attention, but is rich for insight into the Ovid’s life and exile, specifically Tristia 4.10, as an autobiographical poem. This translation and analytical commentary serve as a modern English update to scholarship on Tristia 4.10 and incorporates new scholarly approaches to 4.10 since George Luck’s 1967 commentary in German. I have translated the poem into English prose, with an attempt to best maintain both the structure of Latin grammar and the nuance of the poetry. The commentary focuses on grammar, stylistic, metrical, and historical analyses, and takes into account the context of the poem within Ovid’s other works and Classical literature at large. I have researched other scholarship on the Tristia, employing both Luck’s commentary and Dejonge’s 1950 commentary in Latin for cross-referencing my own work and for expansion on their work. Tristia 4.10 gives an account of Ovid’s life and emotional state in exile, and tells us at least that he was banished for offending Augustus in his poetry. 
Funding provided by National Endowment for the Humanities

2012

Honor and the Status of Women in Democratic Athens

Andrew Yost (2014); Mentor(s): Benjamin Keim

Abstract: The purpose of this research was to gain a better understanding of the social status of women within the classical Athenian democracy, with a particular emphasis on feminine engagement with matters of honor (Greek timê) First, I surveyed modern scholarship on ancient Greek honor and on women in ancient Athens. Next, I read through many texts written by fifth- and fourth-century B.C. authors, ranging from Sophocles to Xenophon, and across genres from philosophy to tragedy. I found that honor was connected to the concept and existence of order. Ancient Athenians considered order to be crucial for a functional society, and this order was achieved by placing both people and things in there correct places, or spheres. When people acted in a way that was expected of them based on what sphere they were in, they were rewarded with honor(s). When people acted in a way that was contrary to how people in their sphere were expected to act, these actions were viewed as dishonorable, and those individuals received shame. With regard to women, it was believed that the gods had assigned them to work indoors. Thus, their sphere was defined mainly by the oikos, or household. Honor was awarded to women based on how well they acted in accordance with their sphere. Although women in democratic Athens were not entirely constrained by men and the oikos, their presence within this sphere was a fundamental aspect of Athenian society and success.
Funding provided by Pomona College SURP